he moves like the ocean: a performance

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he moves like the ocean: a performance
In this performance, adults take on the movements of a child, translating his unique and consuming imaginative play into dance. 3 pairs of dancers and musicians will learn and score short clips of his movement and then improvise in his style. This work explores perception, born of a parent watching her son, diagnosed with co-occurring neuropsychological differences, move and watching others watch him move. It seeks to challenge how we as culture understand invisible disability and difference.
danced by Danielle Ross, Mike Barber and Claire Barrerra
scored and improvised by Reed Wallsmith, Stephanie Lavon Trotter and Tim DuRoche
project by Amy Conway, video, art and language as well
this project has grown over the years, from conception to necessity to reality. it is my story as a parent and as a person. it is about the perception, the understanding and the beauty of difference. three pairs of musicians and dancers will learn, interpret and then perform the movements that my son makes while engaged in imaginative play. that is the simplest way I can explain this project. if i were to define it, i would say that for years i have watched my son move while immersed in a world of imagination and story. i have seen him play his unique games without a worry about what his play looks like while also seeing how others puzzle over his play. he is unique; his brain structured in ways diagnosed as behavioral conditions. but his movement, his imagination, his thinking is beautiful. this work explores his beauty and it explores the way learning how his brain works taught me, his mother, how my brain works.
Bios:
Danielle Ross is a choreographer and performer. She is on the board of the Creative Music Guild, is a founding member of the dance publication FRONT, and co-curated the series Pure Surface with collaborator Stacey Tran. Currently, she is in Chicago working on her PhD in Performance Studies. Her work has been supported by the Oregon Arts Commission, numerous RACC grants, residencies at Studio 2 and PICA’s Resource Room, and the Precipice Fund. Her most recent work, Apparatus, was performed at Disjecta in July, 2017. As a performer, she most often works with the magical Linda Austin. daniellerossperformance.org
Claire Barrera is an artist, educator, activist and mother based in Portland, Oregon.  Currently she is an artist in residence at New Expressive Works.

 

Stephanie Lavon Trotter uses her voice and Sound as a foundation for creating performative installations. Stephanie composes, and improvises with electronics and acoustically; in ensembles and solo. She holds a MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College (2014), a B. Mus in Vocal Performance from Cornish College of the Arts (2008). stephanielavontrotter.com

 

Mike Barber is a choreographer and performer. He is the founder of, and often performs in, Ten Tiny Dances. He is also a retired teacher and currently works as a psychotherapist in Portland. He appreciates the atypical.

 

Tim DuRoche (drums) has worked with Get Smashing Love Power, Battle Hymns & Gardens, the Pebble Trio, and the Kin Trio,  as well as with an array of US and European avant-garde jazz innovators, including Dominic Duval, Burton Greene, Matana Roberts, Bert Wilson, Jon Raskin, Perry Robinson, Jack Wright, Damon Smith, Marco Eneidi, Didier Petit, and Frank Gratkowski, among others. He also has an extensive history working with contemporary dance including projects with Linda K. Johnson, Cydney Wilkes, Tere Mathern, and others. He’s the host of “The New Thing,” a weekly radio jazz radio show on KMHD 89.1 FM and is the author of the book Occasional Jazz Conjectures (Durable Goods).

 

REED WALLSMITH (alto saxophone) performs and composes for Blue Cranes, which has released four albums and several EPs, most recently with the Washington, DC-based Cuneiform Records.  He also performs with Battle Hymns and Gardens, Get Smashing Love Power, and has done stuff with AU / Luke Wyland, Laura Gibson, Ethan Rose, Holland Andrews, Edna Vazquez, Catherine Feeny, Wayne Horvitz, Peter Broderick, Catherine Feeny, PJCE, Eyvind Kang, and Timothy Young.

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this is how I communicate

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it’s with my face

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playing with food: eating our work

I went on a residency at Cucalorus in North Carolina August 3-14 called Playing With Food: Eating Our Work. I wasn’t sure what the residency would be and I didn’t have a specific project in plan. I had thoughts, research, knowledge about food issues both nationally and globally and a ton of possible ideas but no plan.

I think it’s hard to explain because it was work but it was also emotional, it became connection, relationship, support, laughter, storytelling, crying, dancing, swimming, singing madness. And it was necessary. My pal Liz wrote about it for Nashville Arts Magazine : “I WENT TO THE OCEAN AND FELL IN LOVE WITH THIRTEEN PEOPLE.”

I think that sums it up in may ways.

So what work did I do? I wrote, I drew, I took pictures, I talked and talked and thought and thought. It was process. And, it was magic. The pictures of moments, documentation of time and adventure and play.

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Detroit Residency

I spent 3 weeks in Detroit in May (2016) at Spread Art. While there I moved in two directions, mostly. The first was that of engaging in acts of exploration – walking, occasionally by bike, later by car and sometimes with people.  This is Spread:

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Spread Art

The second direction was towards drawing. I spent my time in my studio working on large drawings and my evenings, when I struggled to sleep, making small doodling and meditative drawings. Here are two examples:

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Click here to see more pictures of the drawings I worked on while at Spread Art in Detroit. For now, you can venture to this blog and risk falling into my wildly wandering ramblings.

School Of Making Thinking Residency

RE-RE-MAKE: An Immersive Performance Lab

June 16 – July 6, 2015, Roscoe, New York

I created and participated in a number of performances and performance experiments. I am gathering documentation as I go.

Here is the second performance I did as a response to a peer’s first performance at the residency. I wrote and read something I wrote in response to the prior performance and presented an activity to symbolize change and forward motion. People were invited to put on either a wedding dress or a giant blue jumpsuit and dive down a water slide (it was fun).

And, I have a few pictures from the last performance I did.

Story Telling Machine

My story telling was powered by the physical activity of others. It was an experiment and the first enactment of a project I will continue to build on.

I’ll add more as I can.